Interview Body Language



Interview Body Language :




Previous meta-analyses have found mixed results for which type of question will best predict future job performance of an applicant. For example, some studies have shown that situational type questions have better predictability for job performance in interviews, while other researchers have found that behavioral type questions are better at predicting future job performance of applicants. In actual interview settings it is not likely that the sole use of just one type of interview question (situational or behavioral) is asked. A range of questions can add variety for both the interviewer and applicant. In addition, the use of high-quality questions, whether behavioral or situational based, is essential to make sure that candidates provide meaningful responses that lead to insight into their capability to perform on the job.


Behavioral Questions


Behavioral (experience-based or patterned behavioral) interviews are past-oriented in that they ask respondents to relate what they did in past jobs or life situations that are relevant to the particular job relevant knowledge, skills and abilities required for success.The idea is that past behavior is the best predictor of future performance in similar situations. By asking questions about how job applicants have handled situations in the past that are similar to those they will face on the job, employers can gauge how they might perform in future situations.


Behavioral Interview Question Examples


Describe a situation in which you were able to use persuasion to successfully convince someone to see things your way.


Give me an example of a time when you set a goal and were able to meet or achieve it.


Tell me about a time when you had to use your presentation skills to influence someone’s opinion.


Give me an example of a time when you had to conform to a policy with which you did not agree.


One way individuals can prepare for behavioral type questions is to practice the STAR method. The STAR method is a structured manner of responding to a behavioral-based interview question by discussing the specific situation, task, action and result of the situation you are describing.


Situation


Describe the situation that you were in or the task that you needed to accomplish. This should describe specifics rather than general descriptions of past behavior.


Task


What goal were you working toward?


Action


Describe the actions you took to address the situation with detail and focus on yourself. What specific steps did you take and what was your contribution?


Result


Describe the outcome of your actions. What happened? How did the event end? What did you accomplish? What did you learn? Make sure your answer contains multiple positive results.


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