Letters of Regret

Letters of Regret :


If you are unable to attend a function, particularly one for which you have received a written invitation, a letter of regret is not only polite, but usually expected. The letter you write should be warm and friendly. In many cases, you may want to explain why you are not able to attend. Be sure to thank the person for the invitation and let them know you appreciated it.

April 30 - 2003

Dear Sylvia,

Thank you so much for thinking of us and inviting us to be part of Mark and Emma’s special day. Unfortunately, we will not be able to come because our daughter, Moira, is graduating from Mount Allison University in Sackville that weekend.

You can’t believe how disappointed we are that we will miss the fun with all our old friends. We do, however, want to be part of the donation you mentioned, so I have enclosed a cheque for you to add to the pot.

Thanks again for including us. Please tell Mark and Emma that we will definitely make time to visit them later in the summer.


Anna and Frank

Exercise : II

NOTE : Please use unlined, white paper for this exercise. All letters will be marked for spelling, punctuation, and grammar as well as format and content.

1. Write a letter of condolence to a friend whose father has recently passed away. Follow the format for a condolence letter given in this package. Remember revise and proofread before you prepare the final copy.

2. Write a thank-you letter to a friend or relative, thanking him/her for a Christmas gift. Use your imagination to make it more interesting – perhaps you could describe your Christmas in the letter.

3. Write a letter to your daughter’s teacher. You are concerned about her recent marks, and you would like to arrange a meeting to discuss what can be done to help her.

4. Write a letter to an old friend inviting him or her to attend a family reunion.

5. Write to two letters in response to #4: one letter of acceptance and one of regret.

6. Read the next section on folding personal letters and addressing envelopes. Then, fold one of your letters correctly and prepare it for mailing. Demonstrate how to put it into an envelope.


After you have written a friendly letter, it must be folded, of course – and there is a right way to fold letters. For a friendly letter on writing tablet paper, usually 15 cm × 20 cm, first fold it in half, bottom to top, so that the writing is on the inside. If the letter is still too large to fit into the envelope, fold it again, this time in thirds from left to right. Insert the letter into the envelope so that the reader can open it easily. When removed from the envelope, you should be able to open and read it with one hand, without having to turn it over.


For information on how to properly address an envelope, complete that section at the end of this module.

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