Situational Interview



Situational Interview :




Situational Interview Questions


Situational interview questions ask job applicants to imagine a set of circumstances and then indicate how they would respond in that situation. Hence, the questions are future oriented. One advantage of situational questions is that all interviewees respond to the same hypothetical situation rather than describe experiences unique to them from their past. Another advantage is that situational questions allow respondents who have had no direct job experience relevant to a particular question to provide a hypothetical response. Two core aspects of the SI are the development of situational dilemmas that employees encounter on the job and a scoring guide to evaluate responses to each dilemma.


Situational Examples


You are managing a work group and notice that one of your employees has become angry and hostile in recent weeks to the point of disrupting the entire group. What would you do?


You are in a meeting. Your manager blames you for not doing well on a task in front of all your peers and managers from other divisions. You believe that your manager is wrong in his critique and that he might have come to this conclusion hastily without knowing all the information. You feel you are being treated unfairly in front of your peers. You feel that your reputation may be affected by this critique. What would you do in this situation?


A general request has been issued by the Dean for someone to serve on a new joint government / industry / university committee on business education. The objective of the committee is to design the budgeting allocation for the Faculty for the next fiscal year. It is well known that you have the necessary skill and expertise to improve the chances that the Faculty will receive budget increases for future operations. You have been told that it will require 2 or 3 davs per month of your time for the next 9 months. Your tenure review is one year away. Although you think you have a good publication record, you have no guarantee of tenure at this point. You are concerned because you have already fallen behind on an important research project that you are pursuing with a colleague at another university. What, if anything, would you do?


Other types of questions


Other possible types of questions that may be asked in an interview include… background questions, job experience questions and puzzle type questions. A brief explanation of each follows.


Other possible types of questions that may be asked in an interview include… background questions, job experience questions and puzzle type questions. A brief explanation of each follows.


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