The Introductory Address in A Business Letter



The Introductory Address in A Business Letter :




The Introductory Address in A Business Letter :


The introductory address consists of the name and title and the address of the person to whom the letter is written. It may consist of two, three or even four lines. In business correspondence it precedes the body of the letter and should begin from six to nine spaces — one to one and one-half inches — below the date line. In social and official correspondence, it is placed below the body of the letter, beginning at the left-hand margin. The following models illustrate the correct forms for the introductory address.


(1)

Mr. W. L. Wallace,
Philadelphia, Pa.


(2)

Mr. Henry B. Joy, President,
Packard Motor Car Company,
Detroit, Michigan.


(3)

Mesara. McQuillan & Harriaon,
Jackson, Michigan.


(4)

The Lammera-Shilling Co.,
Chicago, 111.


(5)

Meaara. E. P. Button & Co.,
661 Fifth Avenue,
Hew York, N. Y.


Punctuation — A comma should be placed at the end of each line of the introductory address except the last which should be followed by a period. If a title, such as Secretary, President or Manager, is used after the name, a comma should be placed between the name and the title.


Notes :


1. The second line of the address should be indented the same as the first line of each paragraph — either five or ten spaces on the type-writer. If the address consists of three lines, the third line should begin a corresponding distance to the right of the second line.


2. The form shown in Model 5 called the block style is now used quite extensively. While this form saves a little time, many use it only in letters in which no indentations are made for paragraphs.


The Introductory Address in A Business Letter :






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